This is an archived version of the Virtual Volunteering Project web site from January 2001.
The materials on the web site were written or compiled by Jayne Cravens.
The Virtual Volunteering Project has been discontinued.
The Virtual Volunteering Project web site IS NO LONGER UPDATED.
Email addresses associated with the Virtual Volunteering Project are no longer valid.
For any URL that no longer works, type the URL into archive.org
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For new materials regarding online volunteering, see
Jayne Cravens' web site (the section on volunteerism-related resources).
 
 
 
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working with online volunteers
who have disabilities:

other resources for involving
volunteers who have disabilities

 
This information was last updated on September 4, 2000

Some of this information on the Virtual Volunteering Project site was adapted from other sources, which offer excellent additional information about working with volunteers with disabilities, on or offline:

    (1) Disability Etiquette by Paraquad, a St. Louis-based not-for-profit organization, available at their Web site at http://www.paraquad.org

    (2) Training Manual for Working With Youth Volunteers Who Have Disabilities, produced by Youth Volunteer Corps. Includes practical guidelines, worksheets and evaluation tips, as well as a terrific appendix of resources from other organizations. This manual is not available online, but you can order a printed copy for a small fee by calling Youth Volunteer Corps at 913-432-9822 or email yvca@aol.com

 
You may also find these resources helpful in working with people with disabililities:

     
    Myths and Courtesy Tips for Working with Disabled Volunteers
    http://www.cybervpm.com/divers.htm
    by Nan Hawthorne, CyberVPM
    A list of common myths about disability and helpful tips on courtesy and use of courteous language. Most of these were gathered via the Internet by finding forums devoted to specific disabilities and asking for feedback from disabled people themselves, their families and friends. There is also a list of myths about and courtesy tips for the treatment of non-disabled people by disabled people.

     
    Disability Etiquette Handbook
    http://www.ci.sat.tx.us/planning/handbook/index.htm
    The City of San Antonio produced this excellent guide that includes Reception Etiquette, Conversational Etiquette, Interview Scheduling Etiquette, Interviewing Technique Etiquette, Interviewing Courtesies for Effective Communication, Do and Don'ts, and a Glossary of Acceptable Terms.

     
    Diversity and Volunteerism: Deriving Advantage from Difference
    http://www.energizeinc.com/art/jdiv.html
    By Santiago Rodriguez, from his presentation at the 1996 International Conference on Volunteer Administration, and appearing in the Journal of Volunteer Administration.

     
    Fostering Diversity in your Volunteer Program
    http://www.cybervpm.com/divers.htm
    Also by Nan Hawthorne, CyberVPM

     
    Questions and Answers About Telecommuting for Persons With Disabilities: A Guide for Employers
    http://www.muskie.usm.maine.edu/research/disability/empguide.html
    Produced by Dr. James E. Jarrett, Graduate School of Business, University of Texas at Austin, and the Independent Living Research Utilization Program at the Institute for Rehabilitation and Research in Houston, Texas. While this guide is focused on managers working with paid employees, the advice is easily adaptable to managers working with online volunteers.

     
    Disability Inclusion (ADA) & AmeriCorps
    http://www.txserve.org/programs/disability/
    Although this is AmeriCorps and, sometimes, Texas specific, the information is quite useful to all volunteer managers. This is an extensive set of online resources designed specifically to help leaders involve people with disabilities in AmeriCorps programs, including details on the legal obligations of AmeriCorps programs to people with disabilities, a checklist to help determine accessibility in your AmeriCorps programs and facilities, tips on making your program inclusive and accessible, and other tools for AmeriCorps programs. Also includes ADA-related material. This set of online resources was compiled by Elvia Mendoza, Disability Inclusion Coordinator at the Texas Commission on Volunteerism & Community Service.

     
    Individuals with Disabilities Performing Service Topic Bibliography
    http://www.nicsl.coled.umn.edu/res/bibs/disab.htm
    By Robin C. Vue-Benson and Dr. Robert D. Shumer in 1994, updated in June 1997 by Madeline Hengel, Ph. D. Candidate and Craig Hollander of the National Service-Learning Cooperative Clearinghouse University of Minnesota in St. Paul. The Cooperative is a collaboration between the National Youth Leadership Council, the University of Minnesota,and thirteen other organizations and institutions.

     
    Including People with Disabilities in International Exchange Programs
    http://www.miusa.org
    From Mobility International USA. Advises international volunteer and exchange programs on how to be more accessible to people with disabilities, and offers a referral service.

     
    Job Accommodation Network
    http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/
    While these resources are focused on managers working with paid employees, the advice is easily adaptable to managers working with volunteers. JAN provides disability inclusion consulting services and an extensive library of accommodation information including up-to-date research into accommodation devices and environmental modifications in the workplace. Their web site contains publications on disability accommodation; an index of online disability resources; and a listing of information aimed at specific disabilities and accommodation techniques, resources, and procedures for each listing.

     
    How to Organize a Natural Ties Chapter
    http://www.naturalties.org/organize.htm
    Facilitates one-to-one relationships between people with and without disabilities, to encourage social interaction and civic participation. Natural Ties focuses on college-age individuals, but they have been testing their one-on-one system outside university settings and this age group as well. Their online manual on how to organize a chapter offers advice that can be quite helpful to an agency seeking to involve people with disabilities as volunteers, on or offline.

     
    The Resource Connection
    http://www.etr.org/NSRC/rcv3n3/rcv3n3toc.html
    A publication by the National Service Resource Center, for programs funded by the Corporation for National Service. Volume 3, Number 3 of this newsletter features articles and resources on recruiting and retaining Americorps, SeniorCorps, VISTAS and other CNS members with disabilities, applicable to a variety of non-CNS situations as well.

     
    Disability Discrimination: FAQs
    http://www.courttv.com/legalcafe/health/disabled/disabled_background.html
    Court TV's Legal Cafe discusses the ADA. NOTE: labor laws that apply to paid staff do not always apply to volunteers. Although this resource is geared to the managers of paid staff, volunteer managers will also find this information helpful.

     
    Managing Diversity
    http://www.umich.edu/~igrc
    IGRCC: Program on Intergroup Relations, Conflict and Community. The materials for two courses at the University of Michigan. Includes an excellent bibliography on intergroup relations and managing diversity.

 
If you would like to share information with the Virtual Volunteering Project about your own experiences working with online volunteers, please contact us.

If you have helped or are helping organizations as a volunteer via your home or work computer, please complete our online survey for volunteers and tell us about your experiences.


This component of the Virtual Volunteering Project is made possible by a special grant from the Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation. We are most grateful for their support and collaboration.


If you find this or any other Virtual Volunteering Project information helpful, or would like to add information based on your own experience, please contact us.


 
Copyright © 1999 - 2000 The University of Texas at Austin
All Rights Reserved.


 
This is an archived version of the Virtual Volunteering Project web site from January 2001.
The materials on the web site were written or compiled by Jayne Cravens.
The Virtual Volunteering Project has been discontinued.
The Virtual Volunteering Project web site IS NO LONGER UPDATED.
Email addresses associated with the Virtual Volunteering Project are no longer valid.
For any URL that no longer works, type the URL into archive.org
.
For new materials regarding online volunteering, see
Jayne Cravens' web site (the section on volunteerism-related resources).
 

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